Food maths

April 16, 2008

What could be better than something which combines cooking and maths? (Don’t answer that question. I know that there are large number of answers to the question. Possibly even an infinite number). Let me rephrase that. What a delight – cooking and maths in the one project.

I don’t know about the father of fractal geometry BenoĆ®t Mandlebrot‘s culinary skills, but his as name means ‘almond bread’ I am sure he would be impressed with the idea of these biscuits.

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The wonderful Evil Mad scientist Laboratory features an article this month on how to make fractal biscuits, including even a link to a recipe for the dough!

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As I often ask of such things. Why not?

Thanks to Cliff Pickover’s Reality Carnival for this.

Doing The Rounds

April 8, 2008

The following cartoon has been doing the rounds for a while and I thought it worth putting up here. Unsubtle but clever.

I don’t like to post things unattributed , so I have spent some time trying to find the source. Unless the artist has chosen to be anonymous, I would always prefer to credit them. In this case, I have not been able to find who is responsible. To my eyes it has a French or Belgian look about it, but that may just be because it reminds me of TinTin or Asterix style of cartooning.

I suppose it is possible that it is the work of a Chinese cartoonist who for obvious reasons doesn’t want to put their name to it, but I suspect not.

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Do Play with Your Food

April 4, 2008

These are from a Russian website called Snowfall. I can’t find any hint as to who is the creator of these wonderful photos (or any other of the photographs on the site). They are too good not to post.











Synchrotron

April 2, 2008

I have driven past the synchrotron next to Monash University many times and have wondered what marvelous atom-smashing experiments are going on there. I have been half expecting to hear that someone has successfully collided matter and anti-matter and the whole thing has vanished in a puff of sub-atomic smoke. What I hadn’t imagined is the sort of thing which has been reported from ESRF, the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble.

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Malvina Lak and team from the University of Rennes and Paul Tafforeau of ESRF have been using the synchrotron to examine lumps of amber to reveal the fossils of 100 million year old insects and other tiny living things and then used micro-tomography to produce 3 dimensional models. Wonderful to look at and wonderful to consider that the familiar looking organisms we are seeing lived such a long time ago.

 

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Via BBC news